Volume 9 , Issue 3 , September 2021 , Pages: 166 - 170
Paclitaxel Based CCRT Is an Acceptable Alternative for Cisplatin Based CCRT in the Treatment of Locally Advanced (Stage IVA) Head Neck Carcinoma
Md. Zillur Rahman Bhuiyan, Department of Clinical Oncology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Rokaya Sultana, Department of Clinical Oncology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Ranjan Kumar Bhoumic, Department of Radiotherapy, National Institute of Cancer Research and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Sayed Farhan Ali Razib, Department of Head Neck Oncology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Ashish Kumar Shaha, Department of Radiotherapy, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Ariful Haque, Department of Radiotherapy, Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Received: Aug. 3, 2021;       Accepted: Aug. 12, 2021;       Published: Aug. 24, 2021
DOI: 10.11648/j.crj.20210903.16        View        Downloads  
Abstract
Introduction: Head neck carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer in the world. Concurrent chemo radiation became standard protocol for patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head neck where curable surgery is not feasible. Study Design and Objective: This quasiexperimental study done to compare the treatment response and acute toxicities with the treatment of low dose weekly Paclitaxel with radiation versus weekly Cisplatin with radiation therapy for histologically proven Stage- IVA squamous cell carcinoma of head neck. Methods: All the patients were divided in two groups. Arm-A, 45 number patients received injection Paclitaxel 40 mg/m2, i/v in 1 hr. infusion weekly for 6 weeks and in Arm- B, 45 number patients received injection Cisplatin 30 mg/m2, i/v in 2 hrs infusion weekly for 6 weeks. All patients received 66 Gray (Gy) radiation at the rate of 2 Gy/day, 5 fractions in a week for 6.5 weeks. Results: In this study about 65.55% patients were smoker. Most common sub site was larynx (41.46%) followed by oral cavity (25.00%) The most common presenting features were cervical lymphadenopathy (100.00%) followed by pain (70.00%), sore throat (43.33%) and hoarseness of voice (41.11%). Complete response showed in the patients of Arm-A, 73.33% among the smoker and 66.67% in non-smoker, whereas 72.41% in smoker and 62.50% in non-smoker showed complete response in the patients of Arm-B. Common toxicities related to treatment were mucosities, skin reaction, vomiting, nausea, weight loss, anaemia, leucopcnia, thrombocytopenia and diarrhoea. The toxicities in Arm-A were more than that of Arm-B, but were manageable. Conclusion: In this study it is evident, the concurrent chemo radiotherapy with weekly Paclitaxel is suitable alternative when Cisplatin cannot be given safely.
Keywords
Paclitaxel, Cisplatin: (Anti Cancer Drugs), Gy (Gray): Radiation Unit, CCRT: (Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy:), Locally Advanced Head Neck Carcinoma
To cite this article
Md. Zillur Rahman Bhuiyan, Rokaya Sultana, Ranjan Kumar Bhoumic, Sayed Farhan Ali Razib, Ashish Kumar Shaha, Ariful Haque, Paclitaxel Based CCRT Is an Acceptable Alternative for Cisplatin Based CCRT in the Treatment of Locally Advanced (Stage IVA) Head Neck Carcinoma, Cancer Research Journal. Vol. 9, No. 3, 2021, pp. 166-170. doi: 10.11648/j.crj.20210903.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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